Object  

Transmission series

Transmission One and Transmission Two

Dan Hett

Twenty Thousand Seconds, Dan Hett, 2016. Algorithmically generated live coding image film (from an ongoing series)

Twenty Thousand Seconds

Dan Hett

The Clandestine Purse, Natasha Caruana, 2008

The Clandestine Purse

Natasha Caruana

20Hz, Semiconductor, 2011. HD + HD 3D single channel video. 05.00 minutes

20Hz

Semiconductor

Punchcard Economy, Sam Meech, 2013. ODI: 3.5 x 0.5m knitted banner, FutureEverything: 5 x 3m knitted banner & knitting machines

Punchcard Economy

Sam Meech

Metrography, Benedikt Groß & Bertrand Clerc, 2012. Print on aluminium

Metrography

Benedikt Groß and Bertrand Clerc

Rates for the Job, Sam Meech, 2016. Order form and performative contractual exchange action 

Rates for the Job

Sam Meech

Watching the Watchers, James Bridle, 2013. Multiple mounted colour prints

Watching the Watchers

James Bridle

Six Years of Mondays, Thomson & Craighead, 2014

Six Years of Mondays

Thomson & Craighead

Body 01000010011011110110010001111001, Stanza, 2012. Perspex, Arduino, electronic components, internet connection

Body 01000010011011110110010001111001

Stanza

Weather Gauge, Thomson & Craighead, 2009

Weather Gauge

Thomson & Craighead

{poem}.py

{poem}.py

Pip Thornton

KNITSONIK Stranded Colourwork Sourcebook, Felicity Ford, 2014. Crowd-funded publication

KNITSONIK Stranded Colourwork Sourcebook

Felicity Ford

Forkbomb, Alex McLean, 2001. Perl script computer code with paper output

Forkbomb

Alex McLean

Mini Rugs and their Friends

Mini Rugs and their Friends

Riitta Oittinen

Still Lifes and Oscillators 1, Ben Garrod, 2012. Paint

Still Lifes and Oscillators 1

Ben Garrod

Re-knitting 'tester' Jumper, Amy Twigger Holroyd, 2013. Hacked knitted garment

Re-knitting ‘tester’ jumper

Amy Twigger Holroyd

The spectrum of re-knitting treatments, Amy Twigger Holroyd, 2012. Digital print on paper

The spectrum of re-knitting treatments

Amy Twigger Holroyd

Voyager (Micromégas), Thomson & Craighead, 2013

Voyager (Micromégas)

Thomson & Craighead

Fairytale for Sale, Natasha Caruana, 2011

Fairytale for Sale

Natasha Caruana

Listening to Shetland Wool, Felicity Ford, 2013. Interactive online aporee sound map

Listening to Shetland Wool

Felicity Ford

Flipped Clock, Thomson & Craighead, 2008

Flipped Clock

Thomson & Craighead

Pillars of Hercules, James Brooks, 2014

Pillars of Hercules

James Brooks

Re-knitting step by step guide, Amy Twigger Holroyd, 2012. Digital prints on paper

Re-knitting step by step guide

Amy Twigger Holroyd

The Doffing Misstress Takes a Stroll, David Littler, 2016. Participatory installation. Piano player, paper scores, materials for contribution

The Doffing Mistress Takes a Stroll

David Littler

Listening to Shetland Wool by Felicity Ford

Sonic Pattern and the Textility of Code

Felicity Ford

Corruption, Thomson & Craighead, 2014

Corruption

Thomson & Craighead

Married Man, Natasha Caruana, 2008

Married Man

Natasha Caruana

Three Hundred and Sixty Seconds, Dan Hett, 2016. Algorithmically generated live coding production stills (from an ongoing series)

Three Hundred and Sixty Seconds

Dan Hett

Data as Culture - Art that uses data as a material

From the ridiculous to the sinister, Riitta Oittinen’s project, where craft meets technology, reminds us of the limitations and bias in computational ‘seeing’ systems. In 2014 Riitta experimented with Google image recognition using photos of handmade mini rugs – curious to see how accurately their images would be interpreted. The results were surprising. None returned other textile imagery and the searches revealed the system’s bias towards humans and household objects. It was also highly gendered. Reds returned female forms and blues male. Yellow and peachy colours also returned exposed human flesh (predominantly female) yet browns and blacks did not. Three years later, in 2017, she ran the experiment again to see whether Google’s algorithms had improved. Again, Riitta did not get any matches with her rugs.

The installation at the ODI presents her original rugs (made of new and recycled materials: pieces of cloth, candy and food wrappings, shoe laces, bits and pieces of decorative ribbon, nylon, paper, and cotton string, wool and other natural fibres) alongside the photographs and two sets of results from the searches, 2014 on the left and 2017 on the right. With current concerns of widespread image recognition and surveillance, it is intriguing that a simple rug appears to be a mystery to Google’s machine learning software. We are asked to consider what other imagery is unable to be recognised by these seemingly ‘intelligent’ systems.